book meme!

Nov. 19th, 2010 08:45 am
lobolance: (Default)
Great way to start the morning. Thanks [livejournal.com profile] allanh! There are a few here I still hope to get to. :-)
--

Have you read more than 6 of these books? The BBC believes most people will have read only 6 of the 100 books listed here.


Instructions: Copy this list; bold those books you've read in their entirety. Italicize the ones you started but didn't finish or read only an excerpt.



1 Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen

2 The Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkien

3 Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte

4 Harry Potter Series - JK Rowling (This is 7 books!!!)

5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee

6 The Bible

7 Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte

8 Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell

9 His Dark Materials - Philip Pullman (This is 3 books!!!)

10 Great Expectations - Charles Dickens

11 Little Women - Louisa M Alcott

12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy

13 Catch 22 - Joseph Heller

14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
15 Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurier

16 The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien

17 Birdsong - Sebastian Faulk

18 Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger

19 The Time Traveller’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger

20 Middlemarch - George Eliot

21 Gone With The Wind - Margaret Mitchell

22 The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald

23 Bleak House - Charles Dickens

24 War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy

25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams

26 Brideshead Revisited - Evelyn Waugh

27 Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky

28 Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck

29 Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll

30 The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame

31 Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy

32 David Copperfield - Charles Dickens

33 Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis (All of them)

34 Emma - Jane Austen

35 Persuasion - Jane Austen

36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis (yeah duplication)

37 The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini

38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres

39 Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden

40 Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne

41 Animal Farm - George Orwell

42 The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown

43 One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez

44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving

45 The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins

46 Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery

47 Far From The Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy

48 The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood

49 Lord of the Flies - William Golding

50 Atonement - Ian McEwan

51 Life of Pi - Yann Martel

52 Dune - Frank Herbert

53 Cold Comfort Farm - Stella Gibbons

54 Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen

55 A Suitable Boy - Vikram Seth

56 The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon

57 A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens

58 Brave New World - Aldous Huxley

59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time - Mark Haddon

60 Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez

61 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck

62 Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov

63 The Secret History - Donna Tartt

64 The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold

65 Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas

66 On The Road - Jack Kerouac

67 Jude the Obscure - Thomas Hardy

68 Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding

69 Midnight’s Children - Salman Rushdie

70 Moby Dick - Herman Melville

71 Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens

72 Dracula - Bram Stoker

73 The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett

74 Notes From A Small Island - Bill Bryson

75 Ulysses - James Joyce

76 The Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath

77 Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome

78 Germinal - Emile Zola

79 Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray

80 Possession - AS Byatt

81 A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens

82 Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell

83 The Color Purple - Alice Walker

84 The Remains of the Day - Kazu Ishiguro

85 Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert

86 A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry

87 Charlotte’s Web - EB White

88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven - Mitch Albom

89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

90 The Faraway Tree Collection - Enid Blyton

91 Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad

92 The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery

93 The Wasp Factory - Iain Banks

94 Watership Down - Richard Adams

95 A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole

96 A Town Like Alice - Nevil Shute

97 The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas

98 Hamlet - William Shakespeare

99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - Roald Dahl (Also Charlie & The Great Glass elevator, James & The Giant Peach, Mathilda, and Switch Bitch.)

100 Les Miserables - Victor Hugo
lobolance: (Default)
His real name was Samuel Steward, and he lived a very gay life in a time when few others did. The NY Times has a fun book review on a new biography on him, by Justin Spring.
lobolance: (Default)
Harlan Ellison is selling off a chunk of his book collection, from his own rare editions to those given him by friends. Ah, the days of giant bookcases... 

I know some folks have issue with Ellison for his outrageousness, and yeah I've seen him be a jerk too. But he's not alone in that ;-) (darn human beings!). He was the first I-adore-him major author I saw at a con. Fortunately, multiple times. He read the most amazing stories with a verve few authors can match. And of course he ranted frequently with the best.

Anyhow, much drool-worthy stuff!
lobolance: (Default)
For one week, access to a bunch of freebies from Tor, including novels.

http://tor.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=blog&id=577 ;
lobolance: (Default)

[protected post] I read books. Most of my friends read books. Who are these people who don't read books?

1) Look at the list and bold those you have read.
2) Italicize those you intend to read
3) Underline the books you LOVE.
4) Reprint this list in your own LJ so we can try and track down these people who've read 6 and force books upon them.

...where's the mark for read it and hated it? I have a few of those!


1 Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
2 The Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkien

3 Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
4 Harry Potter series - JK Rowling
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee

6 The Bible
7 Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte
8 Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
9 His Dark Materials - Philip Pullman

10 Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
11 Little Women - Louisa M Alcott

12 Tess of the D'Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy
13 Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
15 Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurier
16 The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
17 Birdsong - Sebastian Faulks
18 Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
19 The Time Traveller's Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
20 Middlemarch - George Eliot
21 Gone With The Wind - Margaret Mitchell
22 The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald

23 Bleak House - Charles Dickens
24 War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
25 The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
26 Brideshead Revisited - Evelyn Waugh
27 Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
28 Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
29 Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll

30 The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
31 Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
32 David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
33 Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis

34 Emma - Jane Austen
35 Persuasion - Jane Austen
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - C.S. Lewis
37 The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
38 Captain Corelli's Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
39 Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden

40 Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne
41 Animal Farm - George Orwell
42 The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown

43 One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving
45 The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins

46 Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery
47 Far From The Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy
48 The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood
49 Lord of the Flies - William Golding (gah, like three times in school!!)
50 Atonement - Ian McEwan
51 Life of Pi - Yann Martel
52 Dune - Frank Herbert
53 Cold Comfort Farm - Stella Gibbons
54 Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
55 A Suitable Boy - Vikram Seth
56 The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon
57 A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
58 Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time - Mark Haddon
60 Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
62 Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
63 The Secret History - Donna Tartt
64 The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold
65 Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
66 On The Road - Jack Kerouac
67 Jude the Obscure - Thomas Hardy
68 Bridget Jones' Diary - Helen Fielding
69 Midnight's Children - Salman Rushdie
70 Moby Dick - Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
72 Dracula - Bram Stoker
73 The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett

74 Notes From A Small Island - Bill Bryson
75 Ulysses - James Joyce
76 The Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath

77 Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
78 Germinal - Emile Zola
79 Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray (hate hate hate)
80 Possession - AS Byatt
81 A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
82 Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
83 The Color Purple - Alice Walker
84 The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro

85 Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
86 A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry
87 Charlotte's Web - EB White
88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven - Mitch Albom
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
90 The Faraway Tree Collection - Enid Blyton
91 Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
92 The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
93 The Wasp Factory - Iain Banks
94 Watership Down - Richard Adams
95 A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
96 A Town Like Alice - Nevil Shute
97 The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas
98 Hamlet - William Shakespeare (See above, COMPLETE Works of Shakespeare)
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - Roald Dahl
100 Les Miserables - Victor Hugo
lobolance: (Default)
This weekend I got to attend a few Frameline films. Friday night's treat was *The Polymath*, a film about Samuel R. Delany.
 
Delany has long, long been one of my favorite writers, science fiction and autobiography and an essay or six (I am still uneasy after reading an essay about the lack of science behind so many AIDS proclamations and procedures). He's inspired me, given me hope, and left me utterly in the dark. There are works I need to reread, having acquired enough experience in the world now that I hope I would 'get' them better. But lest ye wonder why, then: back when I was in my late teens I discovered his early/mid works, and in them was treasure. What I would call now a 'queer sensability' filled them (though that phrase wasn't aroudn yet). I found characters without gender, characters with body modifications (though I didn't know that phrase either! at least it existed) of the highest tech sort, gay sex... all food for an alone queer person.
 
Just a couple weeks ago I acquired a copy of *Phallos*, a graphic-novel sized (and styled, with art! yea!) novel, the first new Delany I've read in a time. It's like an orgasm of Delany tropes. Yet more than that... it is the pay-off of years and sentences and novels of bitten fingernails and here-and-gone-again objects. Poetry and sex converge in as hot and impossible and nasty a Delany way as ever (and this is a book about a book, which is itself fiction...). In this book, Delany reveals the core of so many of his works, his philosophy; the missing piece. Literally (in a couple sense of the word).
 
So, there I am, reading *Phallos* almost as slowly as I can stand, so it won't end, a basic reader's trick, and along comes a new lover who I tell about this writer, who attends this film festival yearly, and he looks at the catalog, and my ghod there is a film about that guy Lance was talking about (to synopsize that story),  and off we went to the hot, hot movie theater (San Francisco holds up not well in the occasional heat wave).
 
Treasure, treasure. The director was there and spoke afterwards; so much that didn't make it into the film. My own observation was a wish for some quotes that were about the *people* (aka characters) in Delany's works (particularly I'd've like a science-fiction character or two; after all that's where the vast majority of his readers found him); it's the living beings inhabiting these artisicially described, often ugly worlds, that are the connect-to-able for the readers. And I can understand a director's artistic choice is his choise. Still. It was also a bit long in the middle, as films often seem; I don't doubt the oppressive theater 'helped' there as well.
 
The film kinda goes backwards in time, with quotes and bits of lectures and photos. I began to remember who I was when I found his work, how I worked so hard to find his books and to get as much as I could out of them. And then how I got more info through living, and continued looking for his works, and they got harder to grok at times. But always I could mine a nugget or six, and wanted the rest...
 
It was interesting to see a kind of parallel existence; who he was as a writer, trying to put his experience into his works, a positive gay and literary man, and then me, a youth trying to find, understand, express my own queer, kinky self. I am so greatful for Chip's works (and speaking of: I remember reading *Locus* at the time, and working out eventually that Chip WAS Samuel!), and now for this film. I think the film would be of interest to anyone into Delany himself, great writers, black writers, gay writers, gay experience.
lobolance: (Default)
Brian Dettmer creates incredible sculptures out of books, relecting their content. Book fetishist that's me!

http://coilhouse.net/2008/01/09/brian-dettmers-book-autopsies/
lobolance: (Default)
http://store.doverpublications.com/by-subject-dover-bargain-bin.html

Clip art, costuming, novels, a range of stuff... thought it might be of interest to some. Goes til 9/27.
lobolance: (Default)
to the IMsL crud. Actually, with the help of Airborne early on, I seem to be moving through it pretty quickly. Oooky chest today. ah well. Such is often the result of a con, however said con is defined. :-)

Got a lot of stuff done at home over the weekend, since I was home a lot of the weekend (see above note). Sadly, the Sharks weren't playing! They are tonight.

Unexpectedly, there were two episodes of *Dresden*. The finale was pretty good. I like that the show does little unexpected things pretty regularly. Saw most of the first episode of *Drive*. Nathan Fillion being very wound up. The teen daughter doesn't look so teen to me. ;-) I have the second recorded, and the next is tonight. I really enjoyed Tim Minear at Worldcon this year, and have always liked his quirky tv work. Here's hoping this one is good. It's certainly intriguing. Being Fox, it will likely be canceled in three weeks, but who knows. ;-)

Finished the first Nevada Barr Anna Pigeon mystery novel. It was good. There are lots more to read. Of course, I need to get Hugo reading underway.
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Considering that I am reading *Anansi Boys* by Neil Gaiman right now, this tickled me.

"ACHTUNG!
LoboLance may actually be a spider-human hybrid

Username:


From Go-Quiz.com

Speaking of the book, I am enjoying it... kind've a follow up to *American Gods.* Now I know how Brits must feel when Americans write Grail stories, etc. It's a trip having a Brit write such a Native American style story. :-)
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Anaar was one of the Feri teachers at Pantheacon this year. I'd seen her before, just hadn't known it. I decided I was interested in buying her book, *The White Wand*, as it was about art and spirituality, and mostly because she was cool (I loved her Kala ritual workshop; she shared some stuff that made me see more ways I could integrate the many threads of my spiritual practice-btw that phrase is sounding really lame to me but I don't know what else to use) . But I resisted at the dealer's room... as I had a suspicion... and yes, I'd already bought it earlier in the year and just hadn't gotten round to reading it! But now I was ready.

So I read it at lunch yesterday (yes, it's a slim volume). Aside: I remember when I first came into paganism uh hem many years ago, finding these skinny little books and always thinking they looked ridiculous. I'm quite sure Cora Anderson's *50 Years of the Feri Tradition* was among them, due to it's very remember-able cover... I guess there's a right time for everything). And in truth I still think they look a bit ridiculous, however that is no longer stopping me from finding the gems inside. :-)

This slim book has plenty of shiny gems, much unexpectedly and gratifyingly erotic as well as arty. I suck at "real" art, though I've always loved doing crafts (having a mom and sister who were really good at "real" art didn't help; but I was a good writer, so that's where I focused, which is just fine :-) ). If you're interested in art, paganism, sex, I highly recommend this book, from its thinking to its few but excellent exercises.

What this post is really supposed to be about is one of the book's basic concepts, which entirely whammed me. The idea she posits is that the drive to beauty/"shiny things" is a human basic (think kids), and something to enjoy, not squish. There's a section about personal adornment which fascinated me (historically to contemporarily). Reminded me of how in my own dress I constantly look for something a little brighter, "different"... but which also works in my identity as a leatherman, etc. Yes there's a time for everything I know... but it's an interesting challenge to "display" more than one or two personality characteristics or interests at a time. Especially if you're a man, and don't just want to be perceived as "flaming." Masculinity is terribly serious stuff in our culture.

And of course historically, males dressed to show off a lot! Which reminded me that a phrase for such men is, to this day, "peacock". Which is one aspect of the god as Feri perceives him.

LMAO
lobolance: (Default)
I treasure good stories. Always have. Some, particularly through my teen years, I read over and over again (I still occasionally reread Susan Cooper's *The Dark is Rising* this time of year, though not this year).

I loved mysteries as a kid, in addition to science fiction (which was really hard to find). Robert Arthur (I think more than one person wrote under the name, which horrified me when I found out! :-) ) wrote the Alfred Hitchcock and the Three Investigators series. I have kept about eight of those books ever since.

A little later, I fell for S.E. Hinton, particularly *The Outsiders* and *That Was Then This Is Now* (just like every other outsider reading kid in the 70's ;-) ). I also kept all of her books. I probably read those two thirty times each (I also had most of her others, like *Rumblefish*).

So, this weekend, I gave those books away. To a couple of kids, one set to a boy of about 9, the other to a girl of about 17 (who I really! hope reads them), offspring of friends of mine. Unfortunately, neither kid was around for the passing on. Sigh. Hopefully I'll hear later what they think of 'em.

Anyhow, the real point is... I let them go. Those books are inside of me, part of me (just like Kirk and Spock :-) ), and their physical existence in a box in my garage is not nearly as useful a thing for them or me as for them to be read by someone else. So, I passed them on (still in good shape, I can say). It was a big deal.

I've been working on decluttering for a long time... but now it's moved on to letting go.A deepening. I gave away my water ski (it's too small for me these days, twenty years out of date technology wise, but a huge reminder of something that was a love and important to me), in hopes it will bring happiness to someone else. Being used is a lot better than being in storage.

It's kinda hard work, letting go. I am finding doing it in stages... naturally?... works best. I still feel moments of heart anguish (and sadness), but I also get real satisfaction in thinking I am sharing something of value... both the objects themselves for their intrinsic value, and at least when I give things to people I care about (the mom got a silk vintage kimono I loved), there's some passing on on my ... vibe? love? energy?... as well.
lobolance: (Default)
Not that Harry (though I love Harry Potter, too), Harry Dresden, of the Dresden Files, by Jim Butcher. The current novel is Dead Beat, book 7 of the Dresden Files.

I still find myself entirely enchanted by this fantasy detective series, and the detective himself. The mixture of whimsy and reality delights me. I like how magic works in this universe; it's purely a power thing (not religious), and has very definite rules. Plus there are ghosts and vampires and all kinds of things that go bump in the night. Harry himself is wonderful self-deprecating, very powerful, yet seemingly young as wizards go. I also think he sounds pretty hot... I like how he's masculine AND has a sense of humor.

I guess the plots and some of the structure aren't exactly groundbreaking. But for often amusing, sometimes heart pounding fun, you can't go wrong with these books.

About the cows (possibly squicky)... Read more... )

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